Posts Tagged ‘Space Pics’

SciFi Mixed Links – Space Poop, Comic Book Crossovers, Pluto and Planck Pics

Scott Kelly is halfway through his #YearinSpace. This great infographic from NASA shows the effects of a year in space. Fun fact - his space poop burns through the atmosphere like shooting stars! Image Source: NASA.

Scott Kelly is halfway through his #YearinSpace. This great infographic from NASA shows the effects of a year in space. Fun fact – his space poop burns through the atmosphere like shooting stars! Image Source: NASA.

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SciFi Mixed Links – Pluto Pics, Hans Solo Prequel, Space Survival

After 10 years, NASA's New Horizons will fly by Pluto! Closest approach expected at at 12:49pm BST (7:49am EDT) on 7/14/2015. Image Source: NASA.

After almost a decade in space, NASA’s New Horizons will fly by Pluto! Closest approach is expected at 12:49pm BST (7:49am EDT) today on 7/14/2015, with close-up images sent back a day or two later. Image Source: NASA.

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Easter Eggs and Swans in Space

Hubble image of the Egg Nebula. Image Source: NASA, W. Sparks (STScI) and R. Sahai (JPL)

A psychedelic Easter Egg! Hubble image of the Egg Nebula. Image Source: NASA, W. Sparks (STScI) and R. Sahai (JPL)

The Egg Nebula is a pre-planetary cloud of dust that both hides and reflects the light emitted from its central star. As light reflects across the dust shells further from the center, the light becomes polarized before it reaches Earth.

Just one light-year away from the Egg Nebula is another treat: the Cygnus Constellation (Cygnus is greek for swan). (more…)

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Total Lunar Eclipse: Saturday, April 4

Picture of a lunar eclipse from October 8, 2014. Image Source: Annette DeGiovine Oliveira via spaceweather.com

Picture of a lunar eclipse from October 8, 2014. Image Source: Annette DeGiovine Oliveira via spaceweather.com

A total lunar eclipse will be visible this Saturday throughout Alaska, eastern Australia, northern Japan, and eastern Russia. Those on the west coast of the United States and parts of eastern China will still have a nice view of a partial eclipse. At 5 minutes in length, this will be one of the shortest lunar eclipses in the 21st century.

For more information, see the NASA eclipse page.

Best viewing times (in local time):

  • Anchorage, AK: 3:30-4:30 AM
  • Los Angeles, CA: 4:30-5:30 AM
  • Tokyo, Japan: 8:30-9:30 PM
  • Beijing, China: 7:30-8:30 PM
  • Melbourne, Australia: 10:30-11:30 PM
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