Archive of ‘Art Wikis & Sketches’ category

Vitus-Gray-Balianus B – The Colours of the Amoiete Spectrum Helix

The Amoiete Spectrum Helix of Vitus-Gray-Balianus B celebrate the "Twice Darkness" - a dual lunar eclipse of the sun - with a grand fireworks display. SciFiMix Art "Colours of the Helix", inspired by Dan Simmons' Rise of Endymion.

The Amoiete Spectrum Helix of Vitus-Gray-Balianus B celebrate the “Twice Darkness” – a dual lunar eclipse of the sun – with a grand fireworks display. SciFiMix Art “Colours of the Helix”, inspired by Dan Simmons’ Rise of Endymion.

The Amoiete Spectrum Helix are a race of peaceful human inhabitants on the planet of Vitus-Gray-Balianus B. They live in communities of small adobe cottages, and wear simple robes in hues that match the color of their homes.

The people of Vitus-Gray-Balianus B derive their cultural origins, and their name, from an epic philosophical “symphony-holo-poem” by the renowned poet Halpul Amoiete. In this holographic masterpiece, poet Amoiete used colors of the rainbow (the spectrum) to signify different human virtues. White represented intellectual purity and physical love; red for the passion of art, courage, and political conviction; blue represented the introspective nature of music, math, and art; green represented resonance with technology and nature; and ebony represented human mysteries. In this same manner, the Spectrum Helix clothe themselves and paint their homes, making sure their society reflects the full-colour rainbow of Halpul Amoiete’s song. (Caution – Spoilers Ahead!) (more…)

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Sol Draconi Septem – Wraiths in an Ice Sky

The Ice Wraiths of Sol Draconi Septem prey on the indigenous tribe of Chitchatuk, and vice versa. SciFiMix Art, "Glacier Wraith", background retouched photo from Glacier Langjokull in Iceland. Inspired by Dan Simmons' "Endymion".

The Ice Wraiths of Sol Draconi Septem prey on the indigenous tribe of Chitchatuk, and vice versa. SciFiMix Art, “Glacier Wraith”,background retouched photo from Glacier Langjokull in Iceland. Inspired by Dan Simmons’ “Endymion”.

Sol Draconi Septem is the ice planet of Dan Simmon’s Endymion. It was once a warm, terraformed world on the path of the River Tethys. Following the destruction of the farcasters at the end of Fall of Hyperion, however, Sol Draconi Septem was plunged into isolation, causing it to revert back to its pre-terraformed state. The atmosphere froze into a glacier, joining the sky and earth below into one endless icy landscape. (more…)

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Celebrating Dune in Pictures: Part 10 – Frank Herbert’s Inspirations

This is the last post in a series celebrating the 50th anniversary of Dune. Check out Part 8: Commission of Ecumenical Translators and Part 9: The Butlerian Jihad. In this post, we explore the inspirations behind Frank Herbert’s seminal work, from the ecology of Oregon’s coast, to the tragedies of Greek myth. The sources of information in this post are derived from the Dune novels, Greek mythology, and this interview with Frank Herbert and his wife Beverly Herbert in 1969 (conducted by Willis E. McNelly – author and editor of the Dune Encyclopedia).

The Oregon Coast

Frank Herbert was fascinated by the US Geological Survey's study of sand dunes on the Oregon Coast. SciFiMix Art, inspired by Frank Herbert's Dune.

Frank Herbert was fascinated by the U.S. Forest Service’s study of sand dunes on the Oregon Coast. SciFiMix Art, inspired by Frank Herbert’s Dune.

Frank Herbert was fascinated by ecology, and the ways that man could control nature. His idea for Dune first came from a drive along U.S. Highway 1 along the central coast of Oregon. In this stretch of the road, sand dunes constantly blew across the highway. The U.S. Forest Service put a test station on the central Oregon Coast to see if it could control the flow of the sand with poverty grasses.

This idea of controlling the flow of sand sparked an idea in Frank Herbert’s mind. What if we had an entire world composed of sand dunes – like Arrakis? Can the experiments by the U.S. Forest Service be put together on much grander scale, such that humans can control the ecology of a full-scale planet, by controlling the fluid flow of its sand? (more…)

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Celebrating Dune in Pictures: Part 9 – The Butlerian Jihad

This post is part of a series celebrating the 50th anniversary of Dune. SciFiMix is creating 50 pieces of original artwork covering the main powers in the Dune universe. Check out Part 7: Fremen & Sandworms and Part 8: Commission of Ecumenical Translators.

Butlerian Jihad

The fundamental principle adopted throughout the Dune universe: "Though shalt not make a machine in the likeness of a human mind." SciFiMix Art, inspired by Frank Herbert's Dune and Alex Garland's Ex Machina.

The fundamental principle adopted throughout the Dune universe: “Though shalt not make a machine in the likeness of a human mind.” SciFiMix Art, inspired by Frank Herbert’s Dune and Alex Garland’s Ex Machina.

The Butlerian Jihad, or “Great Revolt”, was a two generation long war between humanity and thinking machines. It serves as a precursor to the events in Frank Herbert’s Dune, and an explanation for its post-technological society.

In the original series, Herbert does not elaborate much on what the Butlerian Jihad entailed, apart from these two brief passages:

“JIHAD, BUTLERIAN: (see also Great Revolt) – the crusade against computers, thinking machines, and conscious robots begun in 201 B.G. and concluded in 108 B.G. Its chief commandment remains in the O.C. Bible as “Thou shalt not make a machine in the likeness of a human mind.” – Dune, Terminology of the Imperium.

” ‘The target of the Jihad was a machine-attitude as much as the machines,’ Leto said. ‘Humans had set those machines to usurp our sense of beauty, our necessary selfdom out of which we make living judgments. Naturally, the machines were destroyed.’ ” – God Emperor of Dune

(more…)

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Celebrating Dune in Pictures: Part 8 – Commission of Ecumenical Translators

This post is part of a series celebrating the 50th anniversary of Dune. SciFiMix is creating 50 pieces of original artwork covering the main powers in the Dune universe. Check out Part 6: House Corrino and Part 7: Fremen & Sandworms.

Part 8: The Commission of Ecumenical Translators (C.E.T.)

Following the two generation war of the Butlerian Jihad of Frank Herbert’s Dune, humanity began to question the religious beliefs that had led to such violence. The religious leaders from various planetary colonies began to meet and exchange views, leading to the creation of the Commission of Ecumenical Translators, or C.E.T. for short.

The Committee of Ecumenical Translators met on a neutral island on Old Earth. SciFiMix Art, inspired by Frank Herbert's Dune.

The Commission of Ecumenical Translators met on a neutral island on Old Earth. SciFiMix Art, inspired by Frank Herbert’s Dune.

The C.E.T. met on a neutral island on Earth in order to come up with a set of guiding principles that could bring together the vast diversity of their faiths. Their goal: “…to remove a primary weapon from the hands of disputant religions. That weapon – the claim to possession of the one and only revelation.” Dune, Appendix II. (more…)

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Celebrating Dune in Pictures: Part 7 – Fremen & Sandworms

This post is part of a series celebrating the 50th anniversary of Dune. SciFiMix is creating 50 pieces of original artwork covering the main powers in the Dune universe. Check out Part 5: House Harkonnen and Part 6: House Corrino.

Part 7: Fremen & Sandworms

The Fremen wear stillsuits that recycle all water produced by the body. SciFiMix art, inspired by Frank Herbert's Dune.

The Fremen wear stillsuits that recycle all water produced by the body. SciFiMix art, inspired by Frank Herbert’s Dune.

The Fremen are the native tribes of the desert world of Arrakis. They have inhabited the Arraki planet for generations, slowly becoming acclimatized to the harsh desert landscape and the necessities of water preservation. The Fremen are characterized by their stillsuits and bourkas. Stillsuits are full-body gear, which harness and reclaim moisture from sweat, exhalation, and bodily wastes. Bourkas are insulated mantles, turbans which provide protection from the sun’s glare and the many sandstorms that sweep the landscape. This gear, though protective, allows for a full range of motion for fighting and hunting. As with everything the Fremen do, their characteristic garb is designed for survival, so much so that “stillsuit discipline” or “water discipline” is a deeply imbedded part of Fremen culture.

(more…)

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